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Revenge porn law implemented in California

December 11th, 2014

 

 

Los Angeles native Noe Iniguez, 36, was the first person sentenced to jail under California’s new “revenge porn law” after posting a photo of his topless ex-girlfriend on her employer’s Facebook page.

 

In the context of this law, “revenge porn” refers to posting an intimate photo of someone on the Internet with the goal of getting revenge on him or her.

 

Iniguez was also sentenced to 36 months of probation and mandatory domestic violence classes.

 

Iniguez was found guilty of three criminal counts. Aside from the state pornography statute, Iniguez also had two restraining order violations.

 

The revenge porn law, enacted in October 2013, forbids posting sexual photos online with the intent to harm a person emotionally.

 

“California’s revenge porn law gives prosecutors a valuable tool to protect victims whose lives and reputations have been upended by a person they once trusted,” said City Attorney Mike Feuer. “This conviction sends a strong message that this type of malicious behavior will not be tolerated.”

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California is one of 13 states to enact revenge porn laws since 2013. These laws vary in intensity from state to state.

 

In Arizona – one of only two states where posting revenge porn is a felony on the first offense – a federal district court judge blocked enforcement of the law last week after the American Civil Liberties Union sued, according to The Washington Post.

 

Editor’s Note: Information from The Washington Post, The New York Daily News and the BBC was used in this report.