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Keep it classy, kids

September 19th, 2013

As Matron “Mama” Morton says in the musical “Chicago,” “whatever happened to class?” As I sit here, clicking away at my typewriter, sporting a tight bun secured to the back of my head and a conservative dress that covers my ankles, listening to the quiet hum of church hymns playing in the background, I shake my head at the fools of our generation.

Okay, maybe I took that a step too far. In fact, I’m not even sure if I own a dress that covers my ankles. But let’s examine the world we’re living in. For all of you MTV-obsessed viewers and People Magazine die-hards, this may be difficult to read, but I’m going to write it anyways: how celebrities act affects us. Unfortunately, this isn’t necessarily a good thing.

Thanks to Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and of course celebrity stalking apps (I recommend StarSpotter), we’re constantly enamored by the lives of stars we admire. I’m not saying you shouldn’t have a celebrity role model. I have a running list of who I admire. I’m just telling you to stay wary. This is your warning.

Let’s take a stroll down memory lane, shall we? Welcome back to the ‘50s, where everyone’s favorite “d” word was considered a scandal. Can you guess what I’m talking about? Divorce: something so common today, it’s practically expected – especially from celebrities. In fact, I always consider it some sort of divine intervention when a celebrity couple survives the 10-year mark without talks of the “d” word. Yet, when Eddie Fisher divorced his wife, Debbie Reynolds, for Elizabeth Taylor, the media deemed the act as a scandal. Taylor was even called a “home wrecker,” even though Fisher and his wife were on the brink of divorce anyway. Back in the day, if a celebrity couple divorced, their reputation was forever tainted. Now, it’s almost expected.

Now we’ll fast forward to modern day Hollywood: all the cool couples are getting a divorce, performers work their way to the top by releasing sex tapes and the term “classy” is loose and arguably nonexistent.

Back in the day, your celebrity status could be stripped from you by divorcing your spouse. Now, you can achieve your fame by releasing a sex tape or having diva meltdown go viral. If Kim Kardashian or Pamela Anderson were around decades ago, would they have achieved the stardom they have attained today? Let that thought sink in.

So, why isn’t anyone doing anything? We’ve become completely desensitized to “sex.” In fact, it’s what defines Hollywood. People also seem to have difficulty separating fact from fiction. This is where the blurred lines occur. Hello, Teen Mom. (Don’t get any ideas of gaining your 15 minutes of fame by getting knocked up.)

In our fast-paced, media-governed society, it’s difficult to realize how skewed our morals have become. The normal folks take a cue from celebrities. Sure, we may not be “twerking” in minimal clothing on national television, but we’re coming close. Although we may not directly admire celebrities, we’re subconsciously becoming them. It’s all we see. It’s all we hear about. Eventually, we’re going to clearly see reality.

The scariest part: the future generations. They’re going to grow up in a world of failed marriages, in affairs and scantily clad girls showing their hoo-has in return for attention. And they’re going to be okay with it. Maybe they’ll even get their own reality television show in return? Welcome to the future. If we don’t rediscover “class” soon, then hold on tight – it’s going to be a bumpy ride.