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Mid-term Elections hit home: JCU students find ways to make a difference in local and national elections

November 11th, 2010

Mid-term elections finally came to a close this past week. As college students, sometimes it can be hard to remember to vote with all that is going on (including studying, extracurricular activities, social events, etc.). John Carroll students still found the time to pay attention to the issues and vote in either their home elections or the local ones in the Cleveland area. 

Many of the students chose to vote absentee in their home elections in order to stay connected to their hometown.  These students felt that even though they were spending the majority of the year in Cleveland, their home elections would still affect them the most.

Nici Fluharty, a freshman from Willard, Ohio, was one of the students to vote absentee in her hometown. She received the absentee application in her John Carroll mailbox and decided to send in her vote so her voice would be heard. 

Fluharty does not feel that she will ever change her registration and vote in the local elections.

She described how she was unsure whom to vote for. “I had to call my dad to discuss the issues and candidates with him, this was the first time I voted and I was not sure what to do,” Fluharty said.

Christine Fleig, also a freshman, is from Cranberry Township, Penn. She registered at home and was able to send in her absentee ballot, which had to be sent in five to seven days before the election. 

Similar to Fluharty, Fleig is very excited to be a first time voter and explained why she decided to vote in her hometown, “I think it is important for people to vote and have their say in the country and local government.”

She did not feel that she would ever change her voting registration to Cleveland unless she chose to stay in the area after college.

Bill Cook has a unique experience in the voting process; he has voted absentee in his home elections as well as in the elections surrounding John Carroll. Bill is a sophomore from Chicago, Ill. 

Last year, Bill decided to register here so that he could vote in the University Heights mayoral elections. 

He felt that that the election would really affect John Carroll itself, so he wanted to be a part of it. He also felt there was no big election going on in Chicago at the time. 

This year, on the other hand, Bill decided to register and vote absentee in his hometown. 

“The elections were very close this year and my vote was very important. I still wanted to stay an active citizen back home even though I am here,” Cook said.

Most people will do this online, but he was home at the time so he went to his local library to register. He filled out his form at the library and then it was mailed back to him at John Carroll so that he could vote and then send it back to Chicago.

Duchess Adjei, a senior, made the effort and returned to her hometown Indianapolis, Ind. to submitt her ballot.

“On Oct. 25 I had to go to the courthouse in Indiana. [I] filled out the sheet and did the whole process there.” Adjei said.

Adjei felt is was important to vote in her hometown jurisdiction not because of the direct impact on her, but on her family.

“Even if I am not there as much as much as I am at school, I think if there is anything I can do to try and change something where I am from that is important. Because I have more of a connection to Indianapolis and my vote impacts my family because they are still there,” Adjei said.

Many students did not vote for this year’s mid-term elections, but several that were asked agreed that they would definitely be voting in the next elections, especially the Presidential Elections in 2012.

Presidential Elections are the most popular elections and many college students would not want to miss the chance to vote in a historical election.  

 Absentee voting is very popular for students since it is a way for students to still feel connected to their hometowns even though they are away.Mid-term elections finally came to a close this past week. As college students, sometimes it can be hard to remember to vote with all that is going on (including studying, extracurricular activities, social events, etc.). John Carroll students still found the time to pay attention to the issues and vote in either their home elections or the local ones in the Cleveland area. 

Many of the students chose to vote absentee in their home elections in order to stay connected to their hometown.  These students felt that even though they were spending the majority of the year in Cleveland, their home elections would still affect them the most.

Nici Fluharty, a freshman from Willard, Ohio, was one of the students to vote absentee in her hometown. She received the absentee application in her John Carroll mailbox and decided to send in her vote so her voice would be heard. 

Fluharty does not feel that she will ever change her registration and vote in the local elections.

She described how she was unsure whom to vote for. “I had to call my dad to discuss the issues and candidates with him, this was the first time I voted and I was not sure what to do,” Fluharty said.

Christine Fleig, also a freshman, is from Cranberry Township, Penn. She registered at home and was able to send in her absentee ballot, which had to be sent in five to seven days before the election. 

Similar to Fluharty, Fleig is very excited to be a first time voter and explained why she decided to vote in her hometown, “I think it is important for people to vote and have their say in the country and local government.”

She did not feel that she would ever change her voting registration to Cleveland unless she chose to stay in the area after college.

Bill Cook has a unique experience in the voting process; he has voted absentee in his home elections as well as in the elections surrounding John Carroll. Bill is a sophomore from Chicago, Ill. 

Last year, Bill decided to register here so that he could vote in the University Heights mayoral elections. 

He felt that that the election would really affect John Carroll itself, so he wanted to be a part of it. He also felt there was no big election going on in Chicago at the time. 

This year, on the other hand, Bill decided to register and vote absentee in his hometown. 

“The elections were very close this year and my vote was very important. I still wanted to stay an active citizen back home even though I am here,” Cook said.

Most people will do this online, but he was home at the time so he went to his local library to register. He filled out his form at the library and then it was mailed back to him at John Carroll so that he could vote and then send it back to Chicago.

Duchess Adjei, a senior, made the effort and returned to her hometown Indianapolis, Ind. to submitt her ballot.

“On Oct. 25 I had to go to the courthouse in Indiana. [I] filled out the sheet and did the whole process there.” Adjei said.

Adjei felt is was important to vote in her hometown jurisdiction not because of the direct impact on her, but on her family.

“Even if I am not there as much as much as I am at school, I think if there is anything I can do to try and change something where I am from that is important. Because I have more of a connection to Indianapolis and my vote impacts my family because they are still there,” Adjei said.

Many students did not vote for this year’s mid-term elections, but several that were asked agreed that they would definitely be voting in the next elections, especially the Presidential Elections in 2012.

Presidential Elections are the most popular elections and many college students would not want to miss the chance to vote in a historical election.  

 Absentee voting is very popular for students since it is a way for students to still feel connected to their hometowns even though they are away.