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Healthy living floors move beyond substance-free

March 18th, 2010

John Carroll University will be offering a Healthy Living floor for the incoming freshman class next semester. Although still in the planning stages, the floor will be a more involved substance-free floor, replacing the existing substance-free floors.

The Healthy Living floor will be available to those incoming freshmen, both male and female, who decide they want more than just a no alcohol and no drugs policy on their floor. Working with Campus Ministry, the nutritionist, and the health and counseling centers, Residence Life is providing students with a more holistic approach to being healthy.

“Being healthy goes beyond no drugs and alcohol,” said John Mack, the assistant director of Residence Life.

Students can join the floor by signing the substance-free contract on BannerWeb and participating in the activities provided as much or as little as they please.

“[We’ll] offer more resources, [but] it’ll be up to those living on the floor what level they choose to do,” Mack said.

One resource for the Healthy Living floor will be the opportunity to speak with a nutritionist, who will guide them in the right direction for an overall healthy eating program.

Sophomore Courtney Byham said, “Eating healthy and exercising regularly, I think, can benefit JCU by giving students a healthier overall lifestyle, and making their academic performance improve.”

Eventually, the floor may have a monthly dinner in the dining hall, collaborating on their ideas about healthy eating with the chef.

Another possible resource for students is having a class where they learn how to use the gym equipment, as well as other ways to become more active and have a healthy lifestyle.

Sophomore Tyler Bond said, “To promote healthy living and good habits in the first year of college will help develop a foundation of knowledge for college students.”

For the first year, Residence Life is only offering the program in Sutowski, Pacelli or Murphy Halls in order to guage student interest.

Depending on the number of students who show interest, the Healthy Living floor could expand beyond just first-year housing to any students who are interested.

“I think it’s a great upgrade to sub-free, and I think it will appeal to more students,” said sophomore Marissa Centofanti, who is a member of the Residence Life Advisory Board.

Residence Life hopes that the new Healthy Living floor will appeal to more students. By remodeling and updating the sub-free floor with a more holistic approach, students have more choices in the way they live, eat and exercise.

“The big idea is presenting options,” Mack said.