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“One Acts” directors promise laughs and intensity

March 19th, 2009

With unexpected twists, creative plots and inventive themes, it’s almost impossible to come up with a reason not to see “The Marinello One Acts,” opening in the Marinello Little Theatre tonight.

“One Acts” will be presenting two new plays beginning with tonight’s performance at 7:30 p.m. and running through March 22.

(Left to right) Freshman Shannon Carroll and juniors Emma Taylor and Bridget Carey, play the three actors in ‘The Marinello One Acts’ play  ‘The Cloak.’

(Left to right) Freshman Shannon Carroll and juniors Emma Taylor and Bridget Carey, play the three actors in ‘The Marinello One Acts’ play ‘The Cloak.’

“The Marinello One Acts” have been active for 11 years, and this year they will include two plays, “Buck Fever” and “The Cloak.” Both plays will be directed by John Carroll University students.

According to Karen Gygli, professor and supervisor of theater productions at JCU, this year’s “One Acts” are comprised of two plays instead of the usual three.

“Both plays are in really good shape,” said Gygli. “Students usually get very excited because these productions are student-run.”

Holly Noffsinger, a senior at JCU, is directing “Buck Fever,” written by Bill Bozzone and “The Cloak,” written by Clifford Bax, will be directed by senior Georgia Michael.

Both students have already taken Directing for the Stage and Little Theatre Workshop courses in the Communications and Theatre Arts Department.

“My aim was to direct a comedy, which is why I chose ‘Buck Fever,’” Noffsinger said.  “I think it will definitely deliver some laughs.”

“Buck Fever” features two men who go hunting and bring along their wives; however, things turn out terribly wrong for the characters.

There are sexual references, guns and swearing involved as one thing leads to another in the twisted plot.

“It’s aimed at a college crowd, and I think they’ll find it funny,” Noffsinger said.

“The Cloak’s” three characters consist of spirits—an Angel, the Newly Dead, and the Unborn.

The play takes place halfway between Heaven and Earth, with the Angel bridging both worlds. This allows the audience to understand and appreciate why an unborn spirit of pure love and innocence would still have the desire to be born on Earth after hearing of its corruption and woe.

“I chose to direct ‘The Cloak’ because of the intensity it poses,” Michael said. “It aims to ask questions like: What happens when we die? Where do we go? What does it mean to give up identity?”

“The play has inspired me and my cast, and we hope that it inspires others,” Michael said.  “We are very excited and hope that our audience members will appreciate the heavy material and go home with something to talk about.”